Home » Bermondsey

Category Archives: Bermondsey

Architects & Places

Make the Pictures Bigger

Click on any picture to enlarge it.
Use the browser back button to return to the post.

St Crispin (Former), Southwark Park Road, Bermondsey now a day nursery

Replacing a war-damaged church this church was built in 1958-59 by Thomas F Ford but made redundant in 1999 and is now used as a nursery.

Most Holy Trinity, Dockhead/Jamaica Road, Bermondsey (Roman Catholic)

A prominent landmark on a turn in the road. It dates from 1960 and is by Harry Goodhart-Rendel replacing a WW2 damaged church.

St John Horsleydown, Fair Street/Tower Bridge Road, Bermondsey

This was a church of 1727 by Nicholas Hawksmoor and John James. It was largely destroyed in WW2 but the lower parts of the walls form the base of Nasmith House used by the London City Mission. It is still surrounded by its churchyard, now a public open space.

Our Lady of La Salette and St Joseph, Melior Street, Bermondsey (Roman Catholic)

Forming part of the street frontage on a tight site. It was designed by Edmund J. Kelly in 1861. It is the Czech Catholic Mission in London as well as a parish church.

St Augustine (Former) , Lynton Road, Bermondsey

Now converted to flats the eastern parts date from 1875-1878 and the western form 1882-1883. The designers were Henry Jarvis and Sons. It was made redundant in 1995 and for 10 years was leased to ABMT Christian Fellowship. In 2005 it was leased for domestic conversion.

St James, St James Road/Thurland Street, Bermondsey

A Commissioner’s church of 1827-1829 by James Savage. The interior was divided in 1965 with the west end and space under the galleries partitioned. This emphasises the great height of the church which has a clerestory above the tall galleries. The interior is dominated by the altar piece painting of the Ascension of Christ by John Wood, dating from 1844. It is currently (November 2018) undergoing restoration work at the west end

Corpus Christi Mission (Former), Ilderton Road, Bermondsey now Christ the King Chapel

A tall building with the worship area on the upper floor. It dates from 1887 and was closed in 1962. The architect does not seem to be known but they were clearly influenced by James Brooks.  It has been used by the Christ the King Chapel since 2002