Home » Articles posted by zoothorn

Author Archives: zoothorn

Architects & Places

Make the Pictures Bigger

Click on any picture to enlarge it.
Use the browser back button to return to the post.

St Mary of Zion, Lower Clapton Road (Ethiopian Orthodox)

The church currently worships in St James Anglican church next door. In 2011 they acquired the Palace Pavillion nightclub that had closed in 2006 (formerly the Clapton Cinematograph built in 1910) to convert into their own church building. As of 2018 the work seems to be progressing slowly.

Cathedral of the Dormition of the Mother of God, Trinity Road, Wood Green (Greek Orthodox)

Barely a 150 metres from St Bartholomew, this is a former Methodist church of 1872, designed by the Rev. J. N. Johnson,  called Trinity Chapel that was acquired in 1970. Church website

   
 
   

St. Barnabas, Finsbury Road, Wood Green Greek Orthodox)

Just off Bounds Green Road between Wood Green and Bowes Park. This is a former Baptist chapel of 1876 that was used by the Catholic Apostolic from 1904 up to the mid 1960s before passing to the Greek Orthodox church. Church website

   
   
   
           

St. Anthony the Great and St. John the Baptist, Sussex Way, Holloway (Greek Orthodox)

In a former  Welsh Calvinistic Methodist chapel near the Seven Sisters Road/Hornsey Road junction.  The church was built in 1873 and designed by A.G. Hennell. Church website

 
 

Swedish Church, Harcourt Road, St Marylebone

Forming part of the street front, this is a building of 1910 by Axel Haig. The church is up a flight of steps on the first floor. The font, pulpit and reredos came from a previous 18th century building in Wapping.

   
 
   
   
   
   
   
   
   

St Luke, Fernhead Road/Kilburn Lane, West Kilburn

Near Queens Park station, this is a church of 1959 by Michael Farey. The clerestory features a series of windows by Francis Spear.

                 
   
   
   
   
   
   
   
   

St Andrew new church, Church lane, Kingsbury

On a commanding site above the road. The church was built by Samuel Daukes and Hamilton in 1847 in Wells Street in central London. It was one of the earliest scholarly gothic revival buildings and had a stong Anglo-catholic ethos. Surplus to requirements in central London tt was moved to Kingsbury in 1934 by W.A Forsyth to provide an appropriately sized church for the growing suburb. Inside there are furnishings by the cream of 19th century architects and designers including Alfred Bell, Butterfield, Pearson and Street